Institute for Social Justice

Thinking through the moral maze of immigration

Professorial Fellow Joseph Carens will be speaking as part of the Cranlana Speakers Series in Melbourne.Joseph Carens Horizontal

Public discourse on immigration is either hardened into fixed pro- or anti-migration stances or preoccupied with practicalities: How can we fill skills gaps in the labour market? How can we offset the effects of an ageing population? How can we attract more foreign students?  How can we get our fruit picked? How do we stop the boats and/or save lives at sea? How how many refugees can we afford to resettle each year? But if we get behind the detail and the complexity, and move beyond bureaucratic terminology like ‘border control’ and ‘orderly migration’, then what are the core ethical concerns that we need to work through in thinking about immigration?

This talk will also be broadcast by ABC Radio National’s Big Ideas.

 

 

Women in Dark Times

Professorial Fellow Jacqueline Rose will be speaking at the Sydney Writers Festival 2017.Professor Jacqueline Rose small

What do German-Jewish painter Charlotte Salomon, revolutionary socialist Rosa Luxemburg and Hollywood actress Marilyn Monroe have in common? According to academic and author Jacqueline Rose, they are women in ‘dark times’ with the courage to bring the unspeakable to light. She talks to ABC RN’s Sarah Kanowski about her visionary book Women in Dark Times, which ranges across the last century and into today’s reality, arguing vigorously that the work of feminism is far from done.

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On Remarkable Women

Professorial Fellow Jacqueline Rose will be speaking at the Sydney Writers Festival 2017.Professor Jacqueline Rose small

Writer Jacqueline Rose (Women in Dark Times) delivers a lecture on Rosa Luxemburg and Marilyn Monroe, who are linked in little-known ways. Jacqueline discusses their lives and offers insights into the problems they faced, which are relevant to feminism today. Luxemburg and Monroe embodied stereotypes: Luxemburg all mind and no body; Monroe all body and no mind. Against such crass typecasting, Jacqueline treats these women with the dignity that they – and all women – deserve.

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